About your Search

20121027
20121104
SHOW
( more )
STATION
MSNBC 36
MSNBCW 35
CSPAN 26
CNNW 18
FOXNEWS 18
CNN 16
CURRENT 13
FBC 11
KGO (ABC) 8
WJLA 8
CSPAN2 6
KPIX (CBS) 6
KQED (PBS) 6
WETA 5
WMAR (ABC) 5
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 274
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 274 (some duplicates have been removed)
is coming down to science -- numbers-crunching, door-knocking, message-crafting science. and that extends to politics at every level, including a critical group of tight senate races. at this point does anyone really know what is going to dies -- decide all this, gloria? >> no. [laughter] look, it's coming coup -- down to a smaller and smaller group of undecided voters. if you ralk -- talk to republicans, the karl rove theory is that this late in the race, undecided rote -- voters will go to the challenger. if you talk to workers for president obama they say that's not the case. others say they might just stay home and decide not to vote. what you saw in those clips you were just showing it the candidates making their closing arguments because in the end after all the negative ads, which i think at this point probably cancel each other out and it's just a lot of noise out there right now, it comes down to a matter of trust. what -- who do you trust? whose character do you really believe in? and overall whose opt tism -- optimism do you kind of buy into? >> we have heard mitt romney with a
an answer or maybe not oh easy answer. this is not just something that is science fiction. we have to deal with it. anything that anybody has mentioned. >> we keep hearing everybody talk about it. we're going to come back and learn from this and build something stronger arrested better. you hear the politicians say that now after this situation that we've had. i have not heard one specific thing like this is what we're going to do. this is how much it's going to cost. homeland security secretary quoteds a saying, this could be the most expensive recovery in history. hurricane katrina cost $106 billion. that's how much it cost to recover from that hurricane. this is going to surpass that. people are going to be thinking what can we do better so we don't have these horrible situations happen, and spending all this money that america will have to spend to recover from it it. >> eliot: the ex-spans and swath from new jersey, pennsylvania upwards, the devastation is huge. the economic toll, the cost of human life enormous, and awful to see. brandi hitt, thank you for joining us tonight. >> eli
to measure in science and engineering when they go to college they're much less likely to get what they call stem degrees in the science and engineering and math degrees if they receive a large preference. a study by friends of mine at the university of virginia found that if you take to students of any color one of whom received a large preferences and one of whom doesn't, the student with a preference has about 40% larger chance of dropping out of science on his path through. the mismatch also affects if with academically inclined students that receive large preferences who with like to become university professors or going to academics sunday, but very predominantly receive low academic grades, clustered at the bottom of the class and decide that academics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experience was in california where the voters passed proposition and we had a large cause i national experiment about what happens when racial preferences are banned from the entire system. the results are extremely clear 21 the bothers. within a half-dozen on the neutrality the number of blacks in
. but you're quite right that many scientists have been very cautious and science has a cautious culture. you could almost say a conservative culture. their peer review process discourages them from even thinking about going out on a limb. and so they -- they are inherently cautious and conservative. but the evidence is now so overwhelming. you know, in the last ten years you showed some of the statistics but there there's an analysis of the extreme hot temperatures on the surface of the earth. they're now 100 times more common than they were just 30 years ago. and it is these extremely hot temperatures that are responsible for the increased evaporation, the increased water vapor in the air the increased drought. and remember this is hardly the only climate related disaster that we've had this year. 65% of the united states has been affected by a very widespread and extreme drought this year. food prices have been affected. much of the west, including the epic fire in colorado springs was on fire this summer
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
in science and engineering when they go to college they're less likely to get what we call s.t.e.m. degrees if they receive a large preference. a study from the university of virginia found if you take two blacks or students of any color who one receives a large preference and one doesn't, the one that receives preference has a larger chance of dropping out. "mismatch" also affects academically inclined students who receive large preference who like to become university professors or academics. but predominantly receive low academic grades and decide economics is not for them. the biggest "mismatch" experiment was in california where voters passed a proposition with a large experiment of what happened when racial preferences are banned from university systems. it is extremely clear for anyone who played cares to look. within a half-dozen years the number of blacks in the university system has gone up by 30%. the number of blacks receiving a bachelor degrees went up by 70%. the number of degrees for hispanics, gpas of gone up. virtually every outcome has been a dramatic improvement. the colu
-- the national academy of sciences, the journal, proceedings of the national academy of sciences took a survey of scientists who work on this a couple of years ago, and there was agreement among 97% of scientists that fossil fuel emissions from human activity lead to global warming. are warming the atmosphere. that's an incredibly high consensus. so it's 97% in agreement. 3% in disagreement. at this consensus. at this point the scientific consensus is very, very strong that burning coal and oil and fossil fuels is warming the planet and leading to these extreme weather situations. >> so, this question really, then, is directed to the 3% of scientists as we look at the latest cover of "business week" it speaks for itself, coral, we had new york city mayor michael bloomberg endorsing the president in a piece largely focused on climate change. is this a wake-up call and could it end the debate? >> the problem is you can't ever say any one specific weather event is caused by climate change but you can look at the growing stack of reports saying we know we're going to see more of this. the national
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
are at the tech museum of innovation in san jose. if you want to come down here and enjoy the great science festival and you want to do that, hey, we have some great weather outside today. it looks like things will stay dry. the temperatures running a little bit cool, 40s and 50s now, but by the afternoon, high pressure taking over. and the temperatures warming up. we're planning on 60s and 70s. much improved weather throughout the weekend. high pressure bringing some 80s by sunday and monday. then cooling off toward the middle of next week. >>> as superstorm sandy bears down on new jersey, delta airlines starts moving planes and people all over the country. >> it's orderly. we know exactly where they're going and it's clean. >> we'll go inside the operations control center this morning to show you how delta shut down service, then restarted it after the storm. >>> and two top intelligence officials from afghanistan came to washington for a training course. then they disappeared. so where did they go and are they a threat? former intelligence insider john miller has some answers only on "cb
. no science about the workout, no science about breathing. they're just saying it's anti-christian. let me tell you something in my opinion it is a constitutionally unhinged argument. there is no basis. you know what, i spent time in federal court getting restraining orders under the first amendment. let them take it into federal court. the federal judge is not going to grant a restraining order. it is not anti-christian, it is not prose la tizing. it is absolutely proper for these 5500 kids to be exposed to this physical workout. >> richard, why now after three years and like a half million dollar grant to keep this program going? >> yeah. i respectfully disagree with my dear friend, avery, on this one. whenever you're using public funds in public schools, you cannot, you cannot force children to take any sort of religious activity. and be in this particular case -- >> isn't that -- is this a religious activity or is this exercise? >> the allegation. >> thank you. that's the point. >> in the course of the exercising, what they are teaching is eastern hinduism. the poses are out of respect
health and science reporter carolyn johnson has a look. >>> normal breaths for now. >> richard was a few strokes from the green when a strange feeling interrupted his round of golf. he knew he was uncomfortable but the symptoms were vague. >> i got a burning sensation across my chest. it was not a pain. >> now it could be gastrointestinal, it could be their lungs or it could be a heart blockage and my job is listening to them and ferret out more selective symptoms that may pinpoint whether they have heart disease. >> the cardiologist said the goal is to avoid running everybody through tests which are effective but also carry side effects. >> ten years of radiation you get in that procedure. >> it includes prescreening patients with a cardiostress test, often involving a treadmill. now a bay area company believes it has an alternative that can help spot which patients are more likely suffering from heart disease more quickly. >> maybe an alcohol pad, bandaid, gauze. >> it was developed by palo alto based dx. it involves a blood draw that can be done at a doctors office but what happens af
believes in science and does not scoff at the idea of climate change and has taken concrete action to combat it, mr. bloomberg said the choice to him is clear. "one sees climate change as an urgent problem that threatens our planet. one does not. i want our president to place scientific evidence and risk management above electoral politics." this endorsement criticized mitt romney's leadership on the other hand saying, "in the past mr. romney has also taken sensible positions, but he has reversed course on all of them and is even running against the health care model he signed into law in massachusetts." mike bloomberg criticizes mr. romney specifically for flip-flopping and dropping his previous positions on climate change then says, "this issue is too important. we need determined leadership at the national level." in other words, i don't think we're going to get determined leadership from mitt romney. i think he has taken occasionally attractive positions, but leadership, no. speaking to you from new york city, this storm and its aftermath, this externality to the big election i
science to get in the way of politics but the obama administration hasn't been out front on the issue either. we will talk mother nature's revenge when chris hayes joins us just ahead. i don't spend money on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [ male announcer ] and it's not just these owners giving the volt high praise. volt received the j.d. power and associates appeal award two years in a row. ♪ i honestly loved smoking, and i honestly didn't think i would ever quit. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. it put me at ease that you could smoke on the first week. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these stop t
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ >> read my lips. ♪ >> jennifer: you are back inside "the war room." i'm jennifer granholm. if you feel like there has been a lot more presidential campaign tv commercials this year than there was in 2008, you would be right. four years ago, about 637,000 adsed a aired at this point in the race. this year, that number has sky rock setted to 915,000 commercials, a 44% increase. unbelievable. enough to make you long for the days when political tv ads were a novelty. well, tonight in part two of our eight-part series the selling of the presidents. barry lank takes us back to when it all began. >> it was 1952 television was the big new thing. >> eisenhower answers america. >> dwight eisenhower's team lead the way to bring the candidate right into america's living rooms. >> help me put the lid on crazy government spending. >> the ads were very effective. they made more than 40 eisenhower america spots. >> the camera in eisenhower was l
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. are we there yet? are we there yet? [ male announcer ] it's the question we ask ourselves every day. is it the safest, the most efficient? the kind of vehicle to move not just people... but an industry forward? are we there yet? are we really? [ male announcer ] are we there yet? we are, for now. introducing the all-new seven passenger gl. motor trend's 2013 sport utility of the year. mercedes-benz. the best or nothing. >>> the air reeks of kerosene. we're at a kkk rally in the heart of mississippi. a countryside still haunted by memories of lynchings and church bombing from decades ago. pastor wallace hartsfield remembers those days only too well. he witnessed a black man dragged through the streets. >> they shot the man and they hanged him and then used his body for target practice, to teach black folk a lesson. >> we're going to need some help. >> reporter: but this is not the distant past. this is just last month in a secluded property in the woods, where people have c
'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. if we took the nissan altima and reimagined nearly everything in it? gave it greater horsepower and best in class 38 mpg highway... advanced headlights... and zero gravity seats? yeah, that would be cool. ♪ introducing the completely reimagined nissan altima. it's our most innovative altima ever. nissan. innovation that excites. ♪ >>> the waves churned up here along the chesapeake bay bridge in virginia beach. we're back with a final check on the path of hurricane sandy. weather channel meteorologist mike seidel is? virginia beach, new jersey tonight, where the wind is whipping up. where can we expect the storm to moving in the next few days? >> reporter: the atlantic now taking over the entire beach here at point pleasant. this morning's high tide was up to there. and lester tomorrow we have two disastrous high tides. by tuesday, this entire coastline is going to be rearranged. take a look at the swirl off cape hatteras, we're still more than 500 miles
to the space station and it brought back nearly a ton of science experiments and equipment. the dragon is the only delivery ship capable of returning cargo now that the shuttle program has ended. >>> big time weather pattern change right here in the bayer and now we're taking about the -- bay area and now we're talking about rain back into the forecast. the rain when you can expect it as eyewitness news continues right here on cbs 5. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, >>> sunday, october 28th where high temperatures across the bay area today reached a good 14 degrees above normal. we banged anywhere if 66 in half-moon bay to 83 degrees in livermore and also to the south in gilroy outside is our live cbs 5 weather camera. see that right there? to you see it? the -- do you see it? the low clouds, the patchy fog, that's what's signaling a weather pattern change right here in the bay area. we hit 76 today in stance. now knocked back -- san francisco. now knocked back down to 76 degrees due to the marine layer that's now flipping underneath the golden gate bridge. currently 68 in san jose after realizing a
flat as a tourist attraction. visitors can get a look at the shuttle at the california science center in los angeles. you can't go inside it, but you can walk underneath it. cool stuff. thanks for being with us. join us tonight.
. >>> the final home of the space shuttle endeavour is open to the public. opening up the california science center in l.a. it features videos, and artifacts from endeavour and the artifact, the shuttle itself. >>> the wizards fourth-quarter comeback falling short. the team's reaction is up next. >> now -- [ indiscernible ] >> yo. >> where is my chicken nuggets! >> ya. >> halloween prankster, a zombie decided to trick young workers at the drive-thru. and the man rears and lunges out terrify -- roars and lunges out terrifying teenagers. teen . >>> the until is still reviewing deangelo hall's outburst with the officials on sunday. a decision is expected tonight or tomorrow. the commissioner said in a radio interview today that the league has very strong rules in the areas of sportsmanship and respect for officials and they will enforce them a grill. -- aggressively. we're not only waiting word on hall but waiting for the recovery of merryweather. the safety has yet to play in a game this year and is hampered by a spring ligament in the left knee since the spring season. reaggravateed twice, in
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> our fourth story, a super storm headed for the northeast. hurricane sandy has lost some strength, but forecasters warn that it is extremely powerful. it's left more than 20 dead across the caribbean. now, states florida to massachusetts are bracing for wind sh rain and widespread power outages. chad myers is tracking sandy. this weather system is massive. tell us how big it is, how wide the impact could be. >> it will be all way from maine to north carolina. every state in that area will get some type of damage. the storm now just leaving the bahamas and it will be making its way up to the northeast. we don't know where it's going to go yet. the the models are from rhode island to about washington, d.c., but i will guarantee you this, every place in this circle will have some type of damage. whether it's wind, trees knocked down, powerlines knocked down coastal erosion or flooding. one of our vendors, wtt, said this may be in some spots, a 1,000 year flood. kind of lik
's not a pure science. i have seen remarkable enthusiasm. when you see this kind of enthusiasm, you got people really all pump up. if you think about four years ago, had you the democrats in the same spot. they were so excited about the opportunity. now you see republicans trading places with them. i see republicans a lot more enthusiastic, a lot more excited than i see the democrats right now. the other thing is, i think there is a sense that what has happened in ohio, we balanced our budget. we have cut taxes. we've tamed our regulators, not to the point if they don't see a problem they don't jump on it, they do. we have the toughest regulations on hydraulic fracking in america. it's the regulators and towns and pounds small businesses. they understand we can't keep doing what we've been doing. >> sean: ohio more than any other state has been subjected to president's hope and change and new tone in washington. he was going to part the ways and all this other stuff. they have been subjected to the people in your great state to probably the greatest smear, slander campaign with more money spen
] [ crowd chants u.s.a. ] >> cenk: i love that reaction. hey, what about climate science? u.s.a.! u.s.a.! we're number one! ha ha, take that, climate change. luckily, not everybody's that dense. new cover of business week is it's global warming stupid. we now have the author of that article, assistant managing editor of bloomberg business week joining us now. some believe this cover story is a bit controversial. do you believe it is? >> no, obviously the cover language is meant to get people's attention but if you read the story itself, you see we're playing it right down the middle. the issue here is not to blame climate change for any one particular storm but to say that the conditions in the atmosphere have indisputably changed and as a result of those changes, all storms generally speaking are going to be prone to be more severe and more frequent and we are beginning to see in undeniable terms the price of the warming of the atmosphere, the warming of the ocean waters and the rise of the ocean waters. >> cenk: paul, here's the problem with that. you say it's undeniable, all the scientist
. with advances in science and technology, there's -- health of the mother has been -- has become a tool for abortions for any time under any reason. >> so there's a pretty strong argument that there's no one's ever died in childbirth, i know what the science is exactly. what to you make of it with these claims now this shouldn't be an exception for life or health of the mother which we know most people honor those exceptions. >> they're simply not true. i thing he's been going to the todd akin school of biology. 1 in 40 pregnancies, women have pre-eclampsia. there are a number of reasons. but the point is this is not what this district is. this is a moderate district of hardworking people, and they believe that women, you know, should be trusted to make decisions about their own bodies. and congressman walsh simply doesn't. >> tammy duckworth, thank you so much for coming on "hardball." good luck next week. >>> when we return, let me finish with a word of warning about mitt romney's transformation in the last couple days, you know, to moderate. >>> let me finish tonight with this. it's
than ever droid does. >>> in the buzz bin, great news for science fiction fans, a new star wars trilogy in the works. disney is buying the rights from george lucas. the films will continue the story from return of the jedi. remember, that was number six. it was originally the third original install. lucas served as a consultant. no word in princess leia will become a disney princess. interesting question. >> maybe mickey mouse will be in it. >> i think the next one will be the jar jar story. >> oh, jar jar. >>> octomom's nanny giving a break when she enters rehab. prompter is not working. help me out, tony. >> and why -- want to give this away now? >> yeah, because there's a reason. >> and why kelsey grammer took his 3-month-old to a party at the playboy mansion. time for hollywood headlines with our one and only favorite, tmz's dax holt. >> are you cupid? who are you? >> i'm prince harry today. [ laughter ] >> let me just stop all my lines of jokes. cleanse my mind. all righty. let's talk about kelsey grammer. why did he take his baby to the playboy mansion, dax? >> here's the deal. ob
% in favor. >> we're talking about 11 fewer days to go ahead and teach the math, the science and the reading. it's important for our students. >> my biggest concern is giving more money to the senators and having them just spend it away. >> prop 30 would raise the state's sale tax and income tax on californians making $250,000 or more. >>> sports of a measure that would require genetically modified foods to be labeled will hold several rallies today in the bay area. supporters said that consumers should be able to choose whether to eat the foods. and opponents say their safe to eat so additional labeling should not be required. they say, if so, the cost will be passed on to the consumer. >>> groundbreaking ceremonies was held for a new food coto the area. and there are plans for other stores to be built in the same shopping center. >>> the california health department is warning people not to eat bulk house farms carrot chips because they could be contaminated to salmonella. they're voluntarily recalling 16-ounce bags of carrot chips with the best if used by dates of november 12th and 13th.
science, junk science in universities and these think tanks that is the moral justification for these harsh restrictive conservative policies which take away corporate accountability, which privatize our schools. that's one of their massive endeavors is the privatization of private schools. they've moved now into funding organizations about propaganda to say there's massive voter fraud and justify the activities in polling places on election days. that includes, melissa, a contribution to true the vote which ended up being returned because true the vote didn't have its 501(c)(3) status, but true the vote and organizations that are working with true the vote. hundreds and hundreds of thousands of dollars to organizations working with true the vote to put a million poll workers in election precincts on election day. >> i want to bring in valerie quickly because she's been making the point about on voting day it should be that every vote counts the same. if it's not advertising, if they're putting voter suppression action in the field, that strikes me as particularly troubling.
from his first daof work this last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. frotd ameritrade. >> well, today's big storm on the east coast taking some attention away from the election and it's only eight days away. and both candidates are more focused on hurricane sandy. obviously, all of us across the country are concerned about the potential impact of hurricane sandy. this is a serious and big storm. charles: and also appears to be slowing town mitt romney's momentum. the latest gallup has romney up 4 points, 50-46 down one point from the previous poll and the latest rasmussen poll has romney romney by 3. we'll get the new number from scott rasmussen shortly and the washington poll, romney with a 1 point lead for the third consecutive day and a lot of people are talking about the controversial ad featuring, actress lena dunham. >> and of anybody, we want to do it with a great guy, it should be with a guy with beautiful, who understands women. >> and andrea, what congresswoman marsha blackburn. a young actress voting for the essential october is offensive to me f
is sort of the science of the campaign. the obama campaign has its ground game down to precise numbers, who they have to turn out where, they're spending so much time and money figuring this out. that's science. the romney campaign is passion, energy, they're coming on, their campaign seems a little more excited. part of that's the nature of being a challenger versus an incumbent running a re-election. depending on which city you're in, boston or chicago, you come out with two different -- both make really compelling cases for themselves. the polls are tight enough that either one could be totally not spinning and believing it, but who knows? >> who knows? >> tom brokaw, just final thoughts in the final days of the campaign, how much should the events matter? then you've got the science of the campaign muddled by the storm. >> well, if nothing happens that is unexpected between now and then, the scenario is going to be does the romney wave override the obama ground game and getting out the vote? the romney people have been counting on what happened with reagan, as you know, in 1980. di
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. vsp members can save on all authentic transitions lenses, including our new transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you. >>> obama's ohio fire wall. cnn is out with a new poll in the state tonight with the the president leading mitt romney 50-46 and that's unchange frd the last cnn poll in ohio taken just avenue the first debate. john king has been looking at the latest numbers. what else does it tell you? >> it's important to look at this poll. thest a small lead. that's yet another poll the president's kept that narrow lead in ohio. you mentioned the horse race. here's one of the biggest factors. in a battleground state like this, the president's getting the democrats, romney's getting a republic
to study. math and science. and english. exactly, yeah. i did not go to university, but being able to help them, i feel excited. >> i am going to be an accountant. >> i'm going to be a lawyer. >> and i'm going to be a nurse. >> the work that we're doing here is bringing change. >>> if there is one good thing about this storm it's that you can get evacuation information, all kinds of information through a lot of different sources. i'm going to tell you how you can do that online. we're downstairs in the cnn newsline. usually not that busy on a sunday night. we brought some people in. tom, one of the managers, and devon, i'm sorry, i had your e-mail up on the air. now he's getting random e-mails from everywhere. stop e-mailing devon. you can get information from tv news conferences, twitter feeds. we want to go to cnn's lori sau segall standing by for us in new york. >> reporter: a lot of people going to nyc.gov. i would say go to wnyc, this is important if you're in the new york area, in the northeast region, you can really look at the different zones. see what zone you're in. i went to it
science and- "religion finds science," or something along those lines on the front page of the major news mags, and you get a sense of that in the medical world, too, that there's another dimension opening up. we were talking about that before the class, that there's something going on because we're nearing the millennium- you know, we don't want to date the class, but there certainly seems to be a lot of interest in religion, and it's popping up in a number of areas. anything else before we trudge into- happily, i should say- into- yeah. >> well, i was going to bring up a dramatic incident that happened to my daughter and myself. we were driving home from peoria, had a nice dinner by my son, and three cars ahead of us, two pickup trucks crashed, and the dynamic portion of the whole thing- because we called 911 and that- was how everyone worked together- cars parked on the side, men lifted the truck off of people. we were able to get the people out- the two boys were okay; the wife was really in bad shape. but i mean, to be part of that, i mean, it is like you just prayed a lot and said,
and from here it's going to go up. the tidal predictions are to the exact science. it's almost like river forecasts. the high drolgss make them with the best knowledge they have. it's not as good as your forecast we give you days in advan advance. it's not the exact science. fluid situation with the storm and a lot of factors and so right now, we're thinking it's going to be about two to three feet higher than what we saw when it was down here on the edge splashing over. that means if i was standing right here at about 8:30 this evening, the water could potentially be somewhere between here to here with wave action over the top of that. this is a flat area in lower manhattan. not a lot of elevation change. about three blocks in inland they have the subways all sandbagged. they are expecting the worst and the possibility of all the water heading underground to the subway system. normally it's heavy rains. they do get flooded. this is saltwater. the electrical switches, all the problems they could have with that. think of the nightmare they would have trying to replace that stuff if it got
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 274 (some duplicates have been removed)